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A comprehensive list of articles about the principles of holistic wellness written by our practitioners.

Emotions & Psychological Health

By Dr Elinor van Ommen.

“Am I too sensitive?” , “why can’t I move on from this?”… these are common questions I hear, and I often meet people who are in distress that relates to difficulty processing emotion.

What do I mean by “processing emotion”? Emotions are normal feelings that come and go in a relatively short amount of time. Or to be more precise, when we are in a state of more optimal functioning, our emotions are fluid: - they come and go but no one particular emotion will dominate our landscape in an unhelpful way. Normal exceptions might be during a time of grief where we feel the “typical” grief feelings in a process will tend to linger for months (a slower state of flow) depending on the severity of the loss. In general, when emotions get stuck for longer than is helpful, or are denied and repressed, we tend to find that physical or psychological problems will manifest. When we can’t let go of worry, and we amplify our concerns, we find ourselves in a state of anxiety and frequent prolonged states of anxiety create certain wear and tear in the physical body. Another example might be when we have experienced sadness and judged it as ‘wrong’ or ‘weak’ we can build a defensive wall of anger around the sadness, and find ourselves short-tempered and lashing out at people we care about. Or we can become totally identified with sadness and loss and descend into a state of hopelessness and depression that blocks our ability to connect with life.

Healthy emotional functioning is when we can feel whatever we feel without judging it. There so many social “rules” that get in the way of this normal flow of emotion and we can absorb these attitudes without even knowing it, common ones are :- “boys don’t cry” or “good girls shouldn’t feel irritated/angry”… and many more. Dropping all the “shoulds” can really boost emotional wellbeing. I’m not saying we drop all moral codes, but the rules about how to feel are not helpful. Sometimes we judge an emotion as so very justifiable that we refuse to let it go. This might be when we have been ‘wronged’ in some way and decide that hanging on to the anger will somehow keep us safe from future emotional pain (really, hanging on to anger usually winds up creating more pain). Hanging on to any wisdom attained from the experience can be good, but not the anger. It may take a different focus, but we can simply feel what we feel, without judging it and then move forward.

 

A combination of factors are at play in emotional distress. Firstly, there is usually some kind of trigger – an external event or an internal thought process, that sparks an emotional response. The things that stop this emotion from flowing freely are usually related to our mental chatter – the thoughts we have that place meaning on things that either amplify the ‘problem’ or diminish our view of our own ability to handle the situation. Or more typically a combination of both. So we simultaneously inflate our perception of the problem and deflate any appreciation of our own abilities to cope.

Learning to process emotions is greatly supported by living life from a state of basic self-acceptance. Starting with the premise that a human life is worthwhile, and that MY human life is worthwhile. A simple affirmation like “I’m a decent person and I’m having a go at life” can really help (any affirmation is more useful when it’s in your own words). This aligns us to a positive view of self. From here, with feet planted firmly on the ground (connected to the present moment) and a sense of myself as a more enduring presence than simply being defined by the most recent thought, or emotion that I just had, then much more is possible. These things are fundamental starting premise for psychological balance. I AM the context in which my thoughts and emotions happen. I am NOT defined by them. I am accepting of myself and I choose to maintain a sense of self-acceptance, self-worth, and self-love.

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Fascinating Fascia

By Reinette Nel.

Fascia is the new buzz word.  For ages we have been cutting away the fascia to get to the more important aspects in the human body like the muscles, bones and organs not knowing or realising that what has been discarded was in fact the largest sense organ within the body.

Fascia is everywhere in the body.  It surrounds and forms an intricate network within every structure.  It is a strong, flexible support system,  the most richly innervated tissue in the body, with a very high density of sensory nerves that help our nervous system orient to our surroundings.

It’s like a smooth and slippery web of connective tissue that attaches, stabilises, encloses and separates.  It is the stuff that holds us together otherwise we would just be a puddle on the floor, almost like jelly.  If you can make everything else in the body disappear (except fascia), you would look like a big piece of candyfloss.

Emotions & Psychological [...]

By Dr Elinor van Ommen.

“Am I too sensitive?” , “why can’t I move on from this?”… these are common questions I hear, and I often meet people who are in distress that relates to difficulty processing emotion.

The Joy of Learning to know [...]

by Jen Taylor.

What is your life purpose, what will you choose & what may be the benefits?

Who would you want to be remembered as, at the end of your life?

Where would you love to make a difference or contribution?

When could you allow yourself to follow your inner knowing and create more space to shine?

There will be many people, places, things which can seem insignificant but may also be alluring and oh so ready to jump in and take you off your path of wiser knowing.  There are many little ways these events can take you away from what may make your heart alight with joy.

Sleep & Fatigue

by Karen Chin.

Are you struggling with fatigue?

Tired all the time?

Feeling exhausted?  Well it doesn't need to be that way!

Overlooking Positive Points [...]

by Karen Chin.

Have you ever noticed what you place your focus on?

Ever wondered how you can get so fixated on something that you can’t see an alternative solution?

Whatever you focus on is generally what you see in life!

Your Best Interests at Heart

by Jen Taylor.

What is it that bothers you?  A problem or issue that could really be worthy of attention.  Something which feels annoying or is even more compelling and having a destructive effect on your health or relationships?  Perhaps it comes as a quiet whisper or a deeper nagging feeling?  Have you been tucking it away, seeing if it could magically disappear?  Hoping that tomorrow will be the day and yet, as each day evolves, the problem and the discomfort is still there.

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